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Frequently Asked Questions

Monuments
Q. What acts are prohibited within a protected monument?
Ans. No person shall, within a protected monument, – do any act which causes or is likely to cause damage or injury to any part of the monument; or discharge any fire-arms; or cook or consume food except in areas, if any, permitted to be used for that purpose; or beg for alms; or· violate any practice, usage or custom applicable to or observed in the monument; or bring any animal for any purpose other than the maintenance of the monument, bring any vehicle except in areas reserved for the parking thereof.
Q. What are the general conditions of filming licence?
Ans. The licence for filming is granted with conditions that –· It shall be valid for the period specified therein, Nothing shall be done by the licensee or any member of his party which has, or may have, the effect of exposing any part of the monument or attached lawn or garden to the risk of damage The filming operation shall be restricted to that part of the monument in respect of which the licence has been granted Shall not film the interior of any protected monument, that is to say such part of any protected monument as is covered by a roof of any description No extraneous matter, such as water, oil, grease or the like, shall be applied on any part of the monument The generating plant for electric power, wherever required, shall be placed away from the monument or the attached lawn or garden The filming operation shall not obstruct or hamper the movement of persons who may lawfully be within the precincts of the monument; Any other condition which the Director General may specify in the licence
Q. How can one get licence for filming?
Ans. Any person intending to undertake any filming operation at a protected monument shall apply to the Director-General in Form IX. Application shall be made at least three months before the proposed date of the commencement of such operation .The Director-General may grant a licence on payment of a fee of Rs. 5,000 (rupees five thousand) in case of professionals and other agencies.
Q. Is filming permitted in the protected monuments?
Ans. No person other than archaeological officer shall undertake any filming operation at a protected monument or part thereof except under and in accordance with the terms and conditions of licence granted by the Director-General.
Q. Is videography is permitted in protected monuments?
Ans. One can undertake video filming from exterior of a protected monument provided it is for non-commercial purpose and does not involve any cast and use of a stand or in any way interfere with customary and religious practices and work.For undertaking video filming in the monuments which are specified in the Second Schedule and where entrance fee is charged video-filming shall be permitted on payment of Rs. 25/-.
Q. Can any meeting, reception, party, conference or entertainment be held in any protected monument?
Ans. No protected monuments shall be used for the purpose of holding any meeting, reception, party, conference or entertainment. However there is provision to hold such events only under and in accordance with permission in writing granted by the Central Government. There is no restriction to any meeting, reception, party, conference or entertainment which is held in pursuance of a recognised religious usage or custom.
Q. Is destroying a protected monument, a cognizable offence?
Ans. Destroying, removing, injuring, altering, defacing, imperiling or misusing a protected monument or removing from a protected monument any sculpture, carving, image, bas relief, inscription, or other like object shall be deemed to be a cognizable offence within the meaning of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898.
Q. What if some one misuses a protected monument?
Ans. Whoever misuses a protected monument shall be punishable with imprisonment which may extend to three months, or with fine which may extend to 5000 Rupees, or with both.
Q. What if some one destroys, removes, injures, alters, defaces or imperils a protected monument?
Ans. Whoever destroys, removes, injures, alters, defaces or imperils a protected monument shall be punishable with imprisonment which may extend to three months, or with fine which may extend to five thousand rupees, or with both.
Q. Is there any provision for the places of worship?
Ans. The protected monument maintained by the Central Government under this Act which is a place of worship or shrine shall not be used for any purpose inconsistent with its character. Where the Central Government has acquired a protected monument under section 13, or where the Director-General has purchased, or taken a lease or accepted a gift or bequest or assumed guardianship of a protected monument under section 5, and such monument or any part thereof is used for religious worship or observances by any community, the Collector shall make due provision for the protection of such monument or part thereof, from pollution or desecration. Any other action as may be necessary.
Q. Can anybody contribute for the maintenance of protected monuments?
Ans. The Director-General may receive voluntary contributions towards the costs of maintaining a protected monument and may give orders as to the management and application of any funds so received by him.The contribution received under this section should be applied for the purpose for which it was contributed.
Q. Can Government acquire a protected monument?
Ans. If the Central Government apprehends that a protected monument is in danger of being destroyed, injured, misused, or allowed to fall into decay, it may acquire the protected monument under the provisions of the Land Acquisition Act, 1894 as if the maintenance of the protected monument were a public purpose within the meaning of that Act.
Q. What does a protected monument means?
Ans. An ancient monument which is declared to be of national importance by or under this act is called protected monument. All ancient and historical monuments which have been declared by the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Declaration of National Importance) Act, 1951, or by section 126 of the States Reorganisation Act, 1956 to be of national importance shall also be deemed to be protected monuments for the purposes of this Act.
Q. Who can grant permission for photography in monuments?
Ans. One can use camera stand, artificial lights or any such appliance with the permission granted by an archaeological officer in writing.
Q. Can one take photographs of protected monuments?
Ans. One can take photograph of any protected monument. One is not authorize to bring camera stand, extra lights, or any such appliance
Q. What is copying?
Ans. Copying, together with its grammatical variations and cognate expressions, means the preparation of copies by drawing or by photography or by mould or by squeezing and includes the preparation of a cinematographic film and video film with the aid of a hand camera which is capable of taking films of not more than eight millimeters and which does not require the use of a stand or involve any special previous arrangement.
Q. What is the present fee structure?
Ans. Persons above the age of fifteen years need to pay an entrance fee for the entree in protected monuments.
Q. Are there different categories among the monuments of national importance?
Ans. All the monuments declared to be of national importance are of equal importance. However, for the purpose of entree fee protected monuments have been classified in two categories. Those which are declared as World Heritage properties by UNESCO are kept in category A where as other monuments where entree fee is charged are classified as category B monuments.
Q. What is the opening time of protected monuments?
Ans. The protected monuments specified in the First Schedule shall remain open during the hours specified against them in that Schedule. Protected monuments for which any agreement is made between owner and the Central Government under section 6 or if any order is made under section 9, will open as per the condition in the agreement of the order. All other monuments shall remain open from sunrise to sunset for public.
Q. How a monument is declared protected?
Ans. Where the Central Government is of opinion that any ancient monument is of national importance it issues a notification (preliminary) in the Official Gazette, of its intention to declare such ancient monument to be of national importance. A copy of every such notification shall be affixed in a conspicuous place near the monument. The notification gives two months’ notice. After the issue of the notification, any person, who may be, interested in any such ancient monument may, object to the declaration within two months. After considering the objections, received during this period, the Central Government may declare the ancient monument to be of national importance by publishing the notification (final) in the Official Gazette. A notification published under section 4 (3) makes the ancient monument to be of national importance for the purposes of this Act.
Q. What is an ancient monument?
Ans. In the AMASR Act, ancient monument means any structure, erection or monument, or any tumulus or place of interment, or any cave, rock sculpture, inscription or monolith, which is of historical, archaeological or artistic interest provided it has been in existence for not less than one hundred years. Definition of monument in the Act, also includes the remains or the site of an ancient monument. Not only that the portion of land adjoining the site of an ancient monument which may be required for fencing or covering in or otherwise preserving such monument, and the means of access to the monument are also termed as ancient monument.
Antiquities
Q. What is antiquity?
Ans. In the AMASR Act, antiquity means any coin, sculpture, manuscript, epigraph, or other work of art or craftsmanship. It also include any article, object or thing detached from a building or cave, and any article, object or thing illustrative of science, art, crafts, literature, religion, customs, morals or politics in bygone ages, any article, object or thing of historical interest.Besides the Central Government may also declare any article, object or thing as antiquity by notification in the official gazette for the purpose of this act.Provided any such object has been in existence for not less than 100 years.
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