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World Heritage Cultural Sites (DRAFT)
Ajanta Caves
Ajanta, Aurangabad
Maintained by Aurangabad Circle
Brief History Ajanta attained a very important tourist destination in the world. The caves, famous for its murals, are the finest surviving examples of Indian art, particularly painting. The caves were excavated in different periods (circa. 2nd century B.C. to 6th century A.D.) In all, total 30 excavations were hewn out of rock which also include an unfinished one. Out of these, five (cave no. 9, 10, 19, 26, and 29) are chaityagrihas and the rest are viharas.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage, Car parking, CCTV
Approach: The Ajanta Caves (75°40’ N; 20°30’ E) are situated at a distance of 107 km north of Aurangabad, the district headquarters. The caves attained the name from a nearby village named Ajanta located about 12 km
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Closed on Monday
Entrance Fee:Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and Afghanistan) and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head. Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated
area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Ellora Caves
Ellora, Aurangabad
Maintained by Aurangabad Circle
Brief History The name Ellora itself inspires everyone as it represents one of the largest rock-hewn monastic-temple complexes in the entire world. Ellora is also world famous for the largest single monolithic excavation in the world, the great Kailasa (Cave 16). Ellora, three different religious creeds, viz., Buddhism, Brahmanism and Jainism. The caves are datable from circa 6th - 7th century A.D. to 11th - 12th century A.D. In total, there are nearly 100 caves in the hill range out of which 34 caves are famous and visited by many tourists, out of which Caves 1 to 12 are Buddhist; Caves 13 to 29 are Brahmanical and Caves 30 to 34 are Jaina.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage, Car parking, CCTV, Ramp
Approach: The Ellora caves, locally known as ‘Verul Leni’ is located on the Aurangabad-Chalisgaon road at a distance of 30 km north-northwest of Aurangabad, the district headquarters.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset Closed on Tuesday
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head (children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated
area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Elephanta Caves
Raigad
Maintained by Mumbai Circle
Brief History The island is named after a colossal elephant found in the island, which is popularly known as ‘Gharapuri’. At present, the statue of elephant is housed at Jijamata Garden in Mumbai. In ancient period, the place is variously identified as Puri which is mentioned in the Aihole inscription of Pulakesin II. It seems, different dynasties held their sway over this island, namely, the Konkan-Mauryas, Trikutakas, Chalukyas of Badami, Silaharas, Rashtrakutas, Kalyani Chalukyas, Yadavas of Deogiri, Muslim rulers of Ahmedabad and then by the Portuguese. The Marathas also had this island under their control and from them it passed into the control of the British.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: The Elephanta Caves (180 56’ 20” N; 720 55’ 50” E), taluka Uran, district Raigad is located on island hills about 11 km north-east of the Apollo Bandar, Mumbai and 7 km from the shore of the mainland
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Closed on Monday
Entrance Fee:Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head (children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Agra Fort
Agra, Agra
Maintained by Agra Circle
Brief History It is one of the most important and robustly built stronghold of the Mughals, embellished with number of richly decorated buildings encompassing the imposing Mughal style of art and architecture. It was constructed by the third Mughal emperor Akbar on the remains of an ancient site known as Badalgarh. Sikandar Lodi (1487-1517) was the first Sultan of Delhi to shift his capital from Delhi to Agra. After Sikandar Lodi who died in 1517, his son Ibrahim Lodi held the fort for 9 years until he was defeated and killed in the battle of Panipat in 1526. Several palaces, wells and a mosque were built in the fort during the Lodi period.
Amenities Available Audio Guides Facility, Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: It is about 2.5 km northwest of its more famous sister monument, the Taj Mahal.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Sunrise to Sunset
Entrance Fee:
Indian Visitors: Total Rs.20.00 (Rs.10.00 by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.10.00 by ADA as Toll tax).
Citizen of SAARC and BIMSTEC countries: Total Rs.60/- (Rs.10/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.50/-by ADA as Toll tax).
Other Foreign Visitor Total Rs.300/- (Rs.250/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.50/-by ADA as Toll tax).
Free entry: Children below 15 years
On Friday ADA does not levy any Toll Tax in monuments.
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Taj Mahal
Agra, Agra
Maintained by Agra Circle
Brief History Taj Mahal, the pinnacle of Mughal architecture, was built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (1628-1658), grandson of Akbar the great, in the memory of his queen Arjumand Bano Begum, entitled ‘Mumtaz Mahal’. Mumtaz Mahal was a niece of empress Nur Jahan and granddaughter of Mirza Ghias Beg I’timad-ud-Daula, wazir of emperor Jehangir. She was born in 1593 and died in 1631, during the birth of her fourteenth child at Burhanpur. Her mortal remains were temporarily buried in the Zainabad garden. Six months later, her body was transferred to Agra to be finally enshrined in the crypt of the main tomb of the Taj Mahal. The Taj Mahal is the mausoleum of both Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Sunrise to Sunset
Friday Closed
Entrance Fee:
Indian Visitors: Total Rs.20/- (Rs.10/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.10/- by ADA as Toll tax).
Citizen of SAARC and BIMSTEC countries: Total Rs.510/- (Rs.10/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.500.00 by ADA as Toll tax).
Other Foreign Visitor Total Rs.750/- (Rs.250/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.500/- by ADA as Toll tax).
Free entry: Children below 15 years
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Sun Temple, Konarak (1984)
Konark, Puri
Maintained by Agra Circle
Brief History Built in the thirteenth century, it was conceived as a gigantic solar chariot with twelve pairs of exquisitely-ornamented wheels dragged by seven rearing horses. The temple comprised a sanctum with a lofty (presumably over 68 m. high) sikhara, a jagamohana (30. m. square and 30. m. high) and a detached nata-mandira (hall of dance) in the same axis, besides numerous subsidiary shrines. The sanctum and the nata-mandira have lost their roof. The nata-mandira exhibits a more balanced architectural design than that of other Orissan temples. The sanctum displays superb images of the Sun-god in the three projections which are treated as miniature shrines. The sanctum and the jagamohana together stand on a common platform studded with an intricate wealth of decorative ornaments and sculptures, often of a highly erotic type.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset.
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Maldives and Afghanistan) and BIMSTEC Countries (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Myanmar) - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head.
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram (1984)
Maintained by Chennai Circle
Brief History Mamallapuram, the city of Mamalla, is after the title of great Pallava ruler Narasimhavarman-I (AD 630-68). It was a sea-port during the time of Periplus (1st century AD) and Ptolemy (AD 140) and many Indian colonists sailed to South-East Asia through this port town. While there is some evidence of architectural activity going back to the period of Mahendravarman-I (AD 600-30), the father of Mamalla, most of the monuments like rock-cut rathas, sculptured scenes on open rocks like Arjuna's penance, the caves of Govardhanadhari and Mahishasuramardini, the Jala-Sayana Perumal temple (the sleeping Mahavishnu or Chakrin at the rear part of the Shore temple complex) are attributed to the period of Narasimhavarman-I Mamalla.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from 6 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Entrance Fee:Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Churches and Convents of Goa (1986)
Goa
Maintained by Goa Circle
Brief History The Churches and Convents at Velha (Old) Goa owe their existence to the Portuguese rule in this part of the western coast of India. The most comprehensive group of churches and cathedrals built during 16th to 17th century AD at Old Goa comprise Se' Cathedral, Church and Convent of St. Francis of Assisi, Chapel of St. Catherine, Basilica of Bom Jesus; Church of Lady of Rosary; Church of St. Augustine. The Church of St. Cajetan is modelled on the original design of St. Peter's Church in Rome. The Church of Bom Jesus with its facade decorated with Ionic, Doric and Corinthian pilasters, shows the application of the Classical order. The Se' Cathedral which was begun as a small chapel built of mud and straw under the order of Alfonso Albuquerque after his conquest of Goa is yet another example of Renaissance with its Tuscan exterior, the Corinthian columns at its portals, the raised platform with steps leading to the entrance and the barrel-vault above the nave. The principal chapel is large and ornamented with engraved pillars and pilasters. The images of Senhora d’Esperanca (Our Lady of Hope), Christ crucified and St. Catherine standing in the centre with statues of St. Peter and St. Paul on either side.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
The monuments are open on all the days, i.e. throughout the year (inclusive of all public, state, national holidays)
Open from: 8.30 A.M to 5.30 P.M – Church complex Sunrise to sunset - other monuments
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Group of Temples, Khajuraho (1986)
Chhatarpur, Khajuraho
Maintained by Bhopal Circle
Brief History Khajuraho, the ancient Kharjjura-vahaka represent today a distinct pattern of art and temple architecture of its own reminding one of the rich and creative period it witnessed during the Chandella rule. It was the principal seat of authority of the Chandella rulers who adorned it with numerous tanks, scores of lofty temples of sculptural grace and architectural splendour. The local tradition lists eighty-five temples but now only twenty-five are standing examples in various stages of preservation. But for Chausath-Yogini, Brahma and Mahadeva which are of granite, all the other temples are of fine grained sandstone, buff, pink or pale yellow in colour Yasovarman (AD 954) built the temple of Vishnu, now famous as Lakshmana temple is an ornate and evolved example of its time proclaiming the prestige of the Chandellas.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India - Rs. 10/- per head Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Group of Monuments at Hampi (1986)
Hampi
Maintained by Hampi Mini Circle
Brief History Traditionally known as Pampakshetra of Kishkindha, Hampi is situated on the southern bank of the river Tungabhadra. Once it was the seat of the mighty Vijayanagara empire. The monuments of Vijayanagara city, also known as Vidyanagara in honour of the sage Vidyaranya were built between AD 1336-1570, from the times of Harihara-I to Sadasiva Raya. A large number of royal buildings were raised by Krishnadeva Raya (AD 1509-30), the greatest ruler of the dynasty. The period witnessed resurgence of Hindu religion, art, architecture in an unprecedented scale. The contemporary chroniclers who came from far off countries-such as Arabia, Italy, Portugal and Russia visited the empire, have left graphic and glowing accounts of the city. It covers an area of nearly 26 sq km and is stated to be enclosed by seven lines of fortifications
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee:For Zanana Enclosure and Vitthala Temple Complex
Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Group of Monuments, FatehpurSikri (1986)
FatehpurSikri
Maintained by Agra Circle
Brief History Akbar (1556-1605), grandson of Babur, shifted his residence and court from Agra to Sikri, for a period of 13 years, from 1572 to 1585 to honour the Sufi Saint Sheikh Salim Chishti, who resided here (in a cavern on the ridge). Akbar revered him very much as the Saint had blessed him with a son who was named Salim in 1569. Akbar gave it the name of Fathabad and which in later days came to be known as “Fathpur Sikri”.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Sunrise to Sunset
Entry Fee:
Indian Visitor and citizen of SAARC and BIMSTEC countries
Total Rs.20.00 (Rs.10.00 by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.10.00 by ADA as Toll tax).
Other Foreign Visitor: Total Rs.260 (Rs.250/- by ASI as Entry fee and Rs.10/- by ADA as Toll tax).
(Note: Foreign Visitors who purchase Agra Development Authority (ADA)'s Pathkar (Toll tax) ticket of Rs.500/- for TajMahal, need not to purchase any other Pathkar (toll tax) ticket, if he/she visits the monuments viz. TajMahal, Agra Fort, FatehpurSikri, Akbar's Tomb, Itimad-ud-Daulah's tomb on the same day) .
Free entry: Children below 15 years
On Friday ADA does not levy any Toll Tax in monuments.
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Group of Temples, Pattadakal (1987)
Pattadkal, Bijapur
Maintained by Dharwad Circle
Brief History The historicity of Pattadakal goes back even earlier to the Pre-Chalukyan period. The place has cultural vestiges ranging in date from the pre-historic times. In ancient times, this place was known as Kisuvolal (valley of red soil) or Pattada-Kisuvolal or Raktapura. In the literary works it was better known as ‘Petirgal’ by Ptolemy in his ‘Geography’ (2nd Century A.D.), Kisuvolal (Kavirajamarga of Srivijaya c. A.D. 840) and Pattasilapura or Hammirapura (Hammirakavya by Singiraja c. A.D. 1500.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: It is situated 22 km from Badami, a taluk headquarters of the same name, district Bagalkot. Badami is the nearest railway station on Hubli-Sholapur meter-guage line. Goa is the nearest airport and Hubli located about 125 km, has domestic air travel facilities. Due to non-availability of halting facilities at Pattadakal, Badami is the convenient place for tourist accommodation.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Maldives and Afghanistan) and BIMSTEC Countries (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Myanmar) - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Great Living Chola temples at
Thanjavur, Gangaikondacholapuram
and Darasuram (1987 & 2004)

Thanjavur
Maintained by Chennai Circle
Brief History The temple was built during the reign of the imperial Cholas who ruled the southern part of India from ninth to twelfth centuries. The imperial Cholas trace their ancestry to the Surya or the Raghuvansa. The celebrated Saiva temple at Thanjavur, appropriately called Brihadisvara and Daksinameru, is the grandest creation of the Chola emperor Rajaraja (AD 985-1012). It was inaugurated by the king himself in his 19th regnal year (AD 1009-10) and named it after himself as Rajesvara Peruvudaiyar. Architecturally, it is the most ambitious structural temple built of granite.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: Approach: Tanjavur is about 330 km from Chennai which is well connected by rail and road.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Hours of opening: 0630 hrs to 2030 hrs on all days
Admission is free
No fee for still photography/ videography with handheld cameras
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Buddhist Monuments at Sanchi (1989)
Sanchi,Raisen
Maintained by Bhopal Circle
Brief History Sanchi, variously known as Kakanaya, Kakanava, Kakanadabota and Bota-Sriparvata in ancient times, has a singular distinction of having remarkable specimen of Buddhist art and architecture right from the early Mauryan period (c. third century BC to twelfth century AD). Sanchi is famous in the world for stupas, monolithic Asokan pillar, temples, monasteries and sculptural wealth. It was Emperor Asoka who laid the foundations of a religious centre at Sanchi fascinated probably by the location of the hill or because of his Queen Devi, who was the daughter of a merchant of Vidisha.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: Sanchi, the stupa village, is situated 45 km away from Bhopal. As one move towards Sanchi either by road or train one can see the main stupa from a distance of 4 km clearly visible amidst lush green landscape. The stupa is located on a hill whose height is 91 m (298.48 ft.)
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Humayun’s Tomb, Delhi (1993)
Delhi
Maintained by Delhi Circle
Brief History Humayun died in 1556, and his widow Hamida Banu Begam, also known as Haji Begam, commenced the construction of his tomb in 1569, fourteen years after his death. It is the first distinct example of proper Mughal style, which was inspired by Persian architecture. It is well known that Humayun picked up the principles of Persian architecture during his exile, and he himself is likely to have planned the tomb, although there is no record to that effect. The tomb was constructed at a cost of 15 lakh rupees (1.5 million). Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian, was the architect employed by Haji Begam for this tomb.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Maldives and Afghanistan) and BIMSTEC Countries (Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Myanmar) - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Qutb Minar Complex, Delhi (1993)
Delhi
Maintained by Delhi Circle
Brief History Qutb-Minar in red and buff standstone is the highest tower in India. It has a diameter of 14.32 m at the base and about 2.75 m on the top with a height of 72.5 m. Qutbu'd-Din Aibak laid the foundation of Minar in AD 1199 for the use of the mu'azzin (crier) to give calls for prayer and raised the first storey, to which were added three more storeys by his successor and son-in-law, Shamsu'd-Din Iltutmish (AD 1211-36). All the storeys are surrounded by a projected balcony encircling the minar and supported by stone brackets, which are decorated with honey-comb design, more conspicuously in the first storey
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC (and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs. 10 per head.
Others: US $ 5 or Indian Rs. 250/- per head
(children up to 15 years free)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Prehistoric Rock Shelters
of Bhimbetka (2003)

Bhimbetka,Raisen
Maintained by Bhopal Circle
Brief History The Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka are located about 45 km south east of Bhopal on the road to Hoshangabad. The site spread over 10 km in length and about 3 km in width has more than 700 rock shelters, of which over 400 have paintings. The earliest human activities are known from the numerous stone tools including handaxes, cleavers and also the pebble tools. Bhimbetka is a natural art gallery and an archaeological treasure. For miles together, the footsteps of the prehistoric man can be easily discerned upon the sands of time, since the caves here house rock paintings, created by man from as early as about 15,000 years ago in vivid and panoramic detail.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: Bhopal (about 46 Km.from Bhimbetka) is the nearest airport connected with Mumbai, Delhi, Indore and Gwalior. Bhopal, on the Delhi-Chennai and Delhi-Mumbai mainline is the more convenient railhead.
Bhimbetka, situated on the Bhopal-Hoshangabad National Highway No. 69, is well connected by bus.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Champaner-Pavagarh Archaeological
Park (2004)

Champaner-Pavagarh
Maintained by Vadodara Circle
Brief History Pavagadh hill was a famous Hindu fortress under the Solanki kings of Gujarat followed by Khichi Chauhans. In 1484, Sultan Mahmud Begarah took possession of the fort and renamed it Muhammadabad. These monuments are located on the Mauliya plateau, which is situated on the hill. The earliest temple datable to 10th – 11th century is dedicated to Lakulisa of which only gudhamandapa and antarala is extant. Other temples belong to Hindu and Jaina sects and are datable to circa 13th – 15th centuries A.D. All the temples are of the Nagara style having garbhagriha, mandapa and an entrance porch.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach: Champaner is located at a distance of 50 km from Baroda and at the foothill of the Pavagadh hill in Gujarat.
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Open from sunrise to sunset
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Red Fort Complex,
Delhi (2007)

Delhi
Maintained by Delhi Circle
Brief History In 1638 Shahjahan transferred his capital from Agra to Delhi and laid the foundations of Shahjahanabad, the seventh city of Delhi. It is enclosed by a rubble stone wall, with bastions, gates and wickets at intervals. Of its fourteen gates, the important ones are the Mori, Lahori, Ajmeri, Turkman, Kashmiri and Delhi gates, some of which have already been demolished. His famous citadel, the Lal-Qila, or the Red Fort, lying at the town's northern end on the right bank or the Yamuna and south of Salimgarh, was begun in 1639 and completed after nine years. The Red Fort is different from the Agra fort and is better planned, because at its back lies the experience gained by Shahjahan at Agra, and because it was the work of one hand. It is an irregular octagon, with two long sides on the east and west, and with two main gates, one on the west and the other on the south, called Lahori and Delhi gates respectively. While the walls, gates and a few other structures in the fort are constructed of red sandstone, marble has been largely used in the palaces.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
Entrance Fee: Citizens of India and visitors of SAARC and BIMSTEC Countries - Rs.10 per head
Others: Rs. 250/- per head
(Free entry to children up to 15 years)
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Hill Forts of Rajasthan
Ranthambhore (2013)

Ranthambhore, Swaimadhopur
Maintained by Jaipur Circle
Brief History Ranthambhore Fort is one among the six hill fort included in the World Heritage list in the year 2013, known for its strategic location and outstanding layout. High straight cliffs and deep gorges of the surrounding have been used for the fortification purposes. Hammir Mahal, Battis Khambha Chhatri, Badi Kachahari, Badal Mahal and Dullha Mahal are other import monument within the fort complex.
Amenities Available Cultural notice board, protection notice board, UNESCO plaque and Braille signage are available at the monument.
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
 
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
Rani-ki-Vav (The Queen’s
Stepwell)

Patan
Maintained by Vadodara Circle
Brief History Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat is located on the banks of the Saraswati River and was initially built as a memorial to a king in the 11th century AD. Stepwells are a distinctive form of subterranean water resource and storage systems on the Indian subcontinent, and have been constructed since the 3rd millennium BC. They evolved over time from what was basically a pit in sandy soil towards elaborate multi-storey works of art and architecture. Rani-ki-Vav was built at the height of craftsmens’ ability in stepwell construction and the Maru-Gurjara architectural style, reflecting mastery of this complex technique and great beauty of detail and proportions. Designed as an inverted temple highlighting the sanctity of water, it is divided into seven levels of stairs with sculptural panels of high artistic quality; more than 500 principle sculptures and over a thousand minor ones combine religious, mythological and secular imagery, often referencing literary works. The fourth level is the deepest and leads into a rectangular tank of 9.5 by 9.4 metres, at a depth of 23 metres. The well is located at the westernmost end of the property and consists of a shaft, 10 metres in diameter and 30 metres deep.
Amenities Available Cultural Notice Board, Protection Notice Board, Toilets, Drinking water facilities, Benches, Signage
Approach:  
Timings of
Visit &
Ticket Price
 
Conservation status: It is in good state of preservation.
Buffer Zone-: 100 metres is prohibited area and further 200 metres is declared as regulated area as per the provisions of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Rules 1959 of Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958 and Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains (Amendment and Validation) Act 2010.
 
 

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